Valley
Striders

 
Calendar / Key Dates 2018

 
Updated 2 November 2018

** This calendar is now in Excel format, click here ** updated 2 November 2018
The notes below do apply to the all versions!

** And in PDF format, click here ** updated 2 November 2018

** And in HTML format, click here ** updated 2 November 2018

Now includes

Key: Please report any errors or any interesting races that should be added to the list to bob@valleystriders.org.uk

Click here for 2017 dates (we don't have a full calendar for 2018 so you may be interested to see what races were when in 2017)

Codes in square brackets as follows

NB See also "General Year Planner"

Full Fell Running Calendar

The authoritative fell running calendar is at www.fellrunner.org.uk

The calendars contain a range of information, some more than others but almost all will at least contain total distance and total ascent (from 2011 this will be metricated). This is also summarised by a set of letters (e.g. AL, BS, CM etc). The first (A, B or C) basically summarises the average amount of ascent and descent per mile (76, 38 and 30.4 m of ascent per mile for A, B and C respectively) in the race whilst the second (S (<6 miles), M (6 – 12 miles) or L (>12 miles)) summaries the distance. For example, Snowdon International Race is 10 miles long with 1000m of ascent, therefore it is category AM.

In addition to this other abbreviations inform potential runners of the nature of the race. A novice would probably be better to avoid races with the initial ER – experience required; in addition you may also see NS – navigational skills required – and LK – local knowledge an advantage. An ideal race for a novice fell runner is probably one signified with the initials PM – partially marked.

Another useful piece of information you can get from race calendars is the record times. These give the potential runner a good guestimate of how long a runner can be out for and the seriousness of the terrain. For example Jura Fell Race at 16 miles long has a record of just over 3 hours, so even the best runners are only just averaging 5 mph, whereas the classic Yorkshire 3 Peaks race, at 23 miles long, has a record of 2:46 so the top runners are 7-8 minute